Troy Fire Department Mission

William S. Nelson

Fire Chief

248.524.3419

(nelsonws@troymi.gov)

The mission of the Troy Fire Department is to provide the highest possible level of fire protection, rescue, and hazard mitigation services to the community. This shall be accomplished with a team of professionals, both volunteer and career, by providing fire prevention, public education, emergency operations, and planning.

The Troy Fire Department is composed primarily of volunteer members with a career staff comprising 6% of the department. Career staff members provide required training; public education; plan review; inspection and code enforcement; permitting; equipment acquisition and maintenance; hazardous material reporting; and emergency management planning to support the department and comply with both state and local mandates.

A proactive approach to fire prevention principles and practices helps to reduce the risk of fire in the community. This philosophy is the basis for an affordable, well equipped, and well trained fire department. Overall, the combination of volunteer and career firefighters saves the citizens of Troy $10-$12 million annually, compared to neighboring communities of similar size and demographics.

The Troy Fire Department is led by Chief William Nelson, a 37-year veteran of the department, and is comprised of six fire stations strategically located throughout the city. Department staffing consists of an authorized strength of 180 volunteer and 10 career firefighters. Administrative support is achieved with one full-time secretary, one part-time office assistant, and five part-time staff assistants. Firefighters, who are highly trained and certified by the State of Michigan, are on-call 24 hours a day to respond to requests for service such as fires, extrications, and other emergencies.



History of the Troy Fire Department.

The Troy Fire Department was organized in 1940 by a group of businessmen and concerned citizens in what was known as Big Beaver, a small "village" located at Big Beaver Road and Rochester Road. This group convinced the Township Board that a fire department was needed as well as a fire truck and other equipment (which were delivered in March, 1940). Prior to that, fire protection was provided by the Clawson Fire Department. The Fire Department had 19 founding members and operated out of a Ford dealership and garage on Rochester Road south of Big Beaver.

In the mid-1940's, as the population began to grow, a second fire fighting group was authorized at Square Lake and Livernois Roads at a settlement known as "Troy Corners." Over the last 60 years, the Troy Fire Department has grown to six fire stations, one training center, 180 volunteer members, and 10 career staff members, continuing its proud tradition of community service.

In 1940, Troy's first fire apparatus was a 1940 American La France pumper. Today, the fire department operates six class 'A' pumpers; three platform ladder trucks; three conventional ladder trucks; one heavy rescue truck; one mobile air tender; one grass fire truck; two reserve pumpers; ; 13 staff vehicles; and several specialized response vehicles.

Did You Know?

  • Troy is the largest fire department in Oakland County and the largest volunteer/combination fire department in Michigan.
  • Troy's Insurance Services Office (ISO) rating of 3 places it in the top 3.4% of communities nation-wide.
  • The Troy Fire Department has a "Safety Committee" comprised of select career staff members and representative fire fighters from each of the six stations. This committee meets to research, evaluate, and recommend new equipment purchases including personal protective equipment, tools, hose, and apparatus. This process helps ensure fire fighters will have the necessary equipment to meet our profession's ever changing needs.
  • The Troy Fire Department has a "Technology Committee" comprised of select career staff members and representative fire fighters from each of the six stations. This committee meets to research, evaluate, and recommend technology upgrades including hardware and software applications. This process helps ensure the department equips its fire fighters with the latest technology to enhance safety and efficiency.
  • The Troy Fire Department hosts a career Exploring program through the Boy Scouts of America. Since 1996 the Post has performed many community service projects and continues to receive ongoing training from Fire Department members.